Category Archives: Metro Parks

Grigg Dam In Fog

Griggs Dam - Click image to enlarge

Griggs Dam – Click image to enlarge

 

You never know what photographic opportunity may come your way so you should always be prepared by having a camera with you. I’ll be the first to admit that I don’t always have my DSLR with me, but I always at least have my cell phone camera with me. The saying, “The best camera you have is the one you have with you” is very true! This past Saturday I was driving home after doing a little Christmas shopping, and wasn’t even thinking about taking any pictures. The weather had been terrible the previous night and most of the day with heavy rain and wind. Over 2 inches of rain had fallen, but the rain had finally stopped and as I passed Griggs Dam on the Scioto River late in the afternoon I could see that the water was flowing over the dam very fast and fog was forming over the swirling water. I love photographing in the fog and couldn’t pass up an opportunity to shoot in the fog, and I even had my DSLR and tripod in the trunk!

The wind was really blowing the fog around, one minute you couldn’t see a thing and the next it was almost clear plus I was losing daylight since it was almost sunset so I had to shoot fast. These views give you the feeling of how fast the water was flowing over the dam, and how powerful it is by the violent churning and swirling, and the fog adds a sense of mystery. The second image is a very tight shot of just the flowing water, meant to be an abstract view. The camera settings for these shots were 1 second at f/11, 67mm focal length and ISO 100.

 

An abstract view of the flowing water - Click image to enlarge

An abstract view of the flowing water – Click image to enlarge

Griggs Reservoir Park as it is formally called has biking/running trails the run the full 2.25 mile length of the park. Within the park there is also a nature preserve, disc golf course, various picnic areas, and a boat launch. The dam was dedicated in 1905, names in honor of Julian Griggs who was chief engineer for the City of Columbus for many years.

If you have any questions about this website or my photography, I’d love to hear from you.  Please click here to email me.

Also posted in General Photography Tagged |

Highbanks Bridge

 

Underneath Dripping Rock Trail bridge - Click image to enlarge

Underneath Dripping Rock Trail bridge – Click image to enlarge

 

Highbanks Metro Park located just north of Columbus Ohio is appropriately named for its massive 100-foot high shale bluffs that tower over the Olentangy State Scenic River. Tributary streams cutting across the bluff have created a number of deep ravines exposing Ohio and Olentangy shales on the bluff face and sides of the ravines.

The Dripping Rock Trail winds through a hardwood forest, passing steep ravines and shale outcroppings. I was photographing various scenes of a stream in a deep ravine along the trail when I looked up and noticed the interesting patterns created by the support structure of the bridge. I climbed up the steep bank under the east side of the bridge and photographed the underneath view of the bridge you see above. The image consists of 3 separate exposures (1-stop under normal, normal, and 1-stop over normal) combined and processed in Nik Software’s HDR Efex Pro Version 2 to create the final HDR image. Below is a low view of the stream covered with leaves showing its shale streambed as it flows under the bridge through the ravine.

 

Stream with leaves - Click image to enlarge

Stream with leaves – Click image to enlarge

 

Please click here to see other images from Highbanks Metro Park. If you have any questions about this website or my photography, I’d love to hear from you.  Please click here to email me.

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City Lights

 

Click to enlarge

Broad Street Bridge, LeVeque Tower, & Ohio Supreme Court – Click image to enlarge

 

Earlier this week I met up with some fellow photographers to do some night photography along the riverfront in downtown Columbus Ohio.  Along the riverfront where the Scioto River flows through the city, the City of Columbus built a very nice “urban oasis” made up of some 145 acres of parkland from the Arena District to the Whittier Peninsula  with an integrated system of parks, boulevards, bikeways and pedestrian paths with fountains, restaurants, benches, swings and various attractions called the “Scioto Mile.”  Some of the main attractions are an amazing 15,000 square foot interactive fountain and an authentic replica of the Santa Maria.  Many of the bridges and buildings are attractively lighted which adds even more atmosphere to the area after dark and are the main subjects for our camera’s this evening.  Taken from the promenade along the east side of the riverfront, the image above includes the Broad Street Bridge, AEP Building, LeVeque Tower, and the Ohio Supreme Court.  Below is a close-up of the Rich Street Bridge.

 

The Rich St. Bridge accented by blue lights - Click image to enlarge

The Rich St. Bridge accented by blue lights – Click image to enlarge

If you have any questions about this website or my photography, I’d love to hear from you.  Please click here to email me.

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Old Rusted Truck

 

End of the road – Click image to enlarge

 

A photographer friend of mine told me about an old rusted truck he had photographed recently in Battelle Darby Creek Metro Park, just southwest of Columbus, OH.  After he showed me a few pictures that he had taken of it, I decided to go photograph it myself since I had not photographed this type if subject before.

Battelle Darby Creek is one of the larger metro parks in the system and features more than 7,000 acres of prairies, fields, and forests along the Big and Little Darby Creeks.  The Darby Creeks are noted nationally for their tremendous diversity and abundance of aquatic and terrestrial plants and animals.  Fortunately I knew the general area of the park that the truck was in, but I had not hiked the trail the truck was on.  My friend told me that the truck was hidden by trees and bushes and hard to see even though it was not more that 10-15 feet off the trail.  He was right, it was definitely hard to see and only after a few helpful text messages from him was I able to find it.  By the time I started shooting, it was after 7 PM and the light was already starting to fade given that the truck was situated in a relatively heavily wooded part of the park so I had no more than an hour to work.  As you can see there isn’t much of the truck left, but fortunately there was room all around the truck so I was able to shoot from a variety of angles and perspectives.  It was a fun shoot and a nice little adventure.

Looking through the rear window – Click image to enlarge

 

If you have any questions about this website or my photography, I’d love to hear from you.  Please click here to email me.

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Tulips

Beautiful spring tulips – Click image to enlarge

 

Last week I visited the Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens and captured this beautiful arrangement of tulips outside on the Conservatory grounds.   A trip to the conservatory is always great, and spring is one of the best times to visit.

The Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens, located just 2 miles east of downtown Columbus Ohio has an amazing history that dates back 150 years!  The 88 acres of land the Conservatory occupies was originally purchased in 1852 by the Franklin County Agriculture Society as a site for the first Franklin County Fair.  20 years later the land was made the official grounds of the Ohio State Fair, and in 1884 the Ohio Legislature declared the site as Franklin Park and open for public use.

Influenced by Chicago’s World Fair Exposition in 1893, the city of Columbus built a Victorian-style glass greenhouse in the park.  The greenhouse opened to the public in 1895 and is known today as the Palm House.

Franklin Park and the Conservatory became the host site for AmeriFlora ’92, a six-month international horticulture exposition.  In preparation for the exposition, the historic Palm House was renovated and a $14-million expansion began in 1989 adding 58,000 square feet and included expanded plant collections, classrooms, a library, gift shop, café and administrative offices.

Today the Conservatory is a premier horticultural and educational institution and is a very popular location for family gatherings, weddings, and a variety of events.  Needless-to-say it’s a very popular destination for photographers and I’m happy to say that the Conservatory and its staff is very photographer friendly.

To learn more about the Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens, please visit their website here.

If you have any questions about this website or my photography, I’d love to hear from you.  Please click here to email me or leave a comment.

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Spring Wildflowers

Spring wildflowers are blooming all around central Ohio, but what you can see varies quite a bit from place to place.  So far I’ve seen Dutchman Breeches (they seem plentiful everywhere), White and Yellow Trout Lilies, Spring Beauty, Virginia Bluebells, and Marsh-Marigolds.  This past Sunday I found some beautiful White and Yellow Trout Lilies and a carpet of Marsh-Marigolds in Indian Run Falls Park gorge, and Dutchman’s Breeches and Virginia Bluebells in Battelle Darby Creek Metro Park.  Spring has been slow to arrive so these beautiful wildflowers are a welcome sight!

If you have any questions about this website or my photography, I’d love to hear from you.  Please click here to email me or leave a comment.

Spring Wildflowers_Dutchmans Breeches.jpgSpring Wildflowers_Marsh Marigolds.jpgSpring Wildflowers_Pair of Yellow Trout Lilies.jpgSpring Wildflowers_White Trout Lily.jpg

 

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Hayden Falls Frozen

Hayden Falls FROZEN – Click image to enlarge

 

The amount of water flowing over the Hayden Falls varies greatly throughout the year, it can be a roaring torrent in the spring or after a hard rain, completely dried up in midsummer, or almost frozen solid in the winter as you see it in the image above.  I live within walking distance of the falls and got there shortly after a new snowfall to capture this scene before the footprints of other visitors ruined the snow on the rocks and surrounding area.  It was late in the day and the starkness of the scene lent itself to a nice conversion to black and white.  Note the partial reflection of the upper part of the waterfall in the still water in the middle of the frame.  Capture information for this image is; Canon EOS 5D Mk III, manual exposure mode, spot metering, 2.5 seconds at f/22, ISO 100, 24mm focal length, polarizing filter.

With the icicles and flowing water there are many compositions possible everywhere you look.  Below is a close up view of layers of ice along the edge of Hayden Run flowing out from the waterfall on its way to the Scioto River.

 

Close-up if icicles & ice along Hayden Run – Click image to enlarge

Hayden Falls is a beautiful waterfall tucked away in a scenic gorge and well worth a visit if you’re in the area.  The falls are very popular so you will likely find other people there when you arrive.

To see a gallery of my images of Hayden Falls, please click here.  If you have any questions, please click here to email me.

Hayden Falls is in Hayden Falls Park, part of Griggs Reservoir Nature Preserve and located at 4335 Hayden Run Rd., Dublin, OH.  43017 close to the intersection of Hayden Run Rd., and Frantz Rd.  GPS coordinates are N 40°4’1″, W 83°6’38”.  The falls are very accessible via a wide stairway from the parking lot to the bottom of the gorge that connects to an elevated boardwalk going out to the base of the falls.  More information can be found here.

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Central Ohio Metro Parks – Part 2

As a continuation of my post on Metro Parks a few weeks (found here), today I want to feature Battelle Darby Creek and Highbanks Meto Parks.

We are fortunate here in central Ohio to have a great Metro Parks system that is strongly supported by the community.  The Metro Parks system was originally established in 1945, and today is made up of 16 parks with more than 175 miles of trails, 26,000 acres of land and water in 7 central Ohio counties.  Each year more than 6 million people visit the parks to escape the hustle and bustle of their everyday lives to discover and experience nature.

 

Big Barby Creek – Click image to enlarge

The image above is a view of Big Darby Creek, a state and national scenic river from which the park gets its name.  Battelle Darby Creek Metro Park is the largest Metro Park in the system with a little over 7,000 acres of prairies, fields, and forests and 18 miles of trails.  Big and Little Darby Creeks are noted nationally for their tremendous diversity and abundance of both aquatic and terrestrial plants and animals.  The creeks are home to about 100 species of fish, and 44 species of freshwater mussels.   To find out more about Battelle Darby Creek Metro Park, visit their website here.

 

Lone maple leaf – Click image to enlarge

Fall has arrived in central Ohio and the image of a lone leaf floating in a small creek along the Dripping Rock Trail in Highbanks Metro Park seemed appropriate.  Even though we’re only 5 days into the fall season, the trees are already starting to show some color.  The blue sky 75 degree days and cool crisp nights are a welcome relief from the hot, humid 90+ degree days we had this past summer.  Highbanks is named for its 100-foot high shale bluffs that tower over the Olentangy State Scenic River.  The park has 11 miles of trails that take hikers through oak-hickory, and beech-maple flood plain hardwood forests.  Highbanks is also rich in Native American history.  The park contains 2 Adena Indian burial mounds and a prehistoric earthwork.  To find out more about Highbanks Metro Park, visit their website here.

If you have any questions about this website or my photography, I’d love to hear from you.  Please click here to email me.

Also posted in Weekly Column Tagged , , |

Central Ohio Metro Parks

We are fortunate here in central Ohio to have a great Metro Parks system that is strongly supported by the community.  The Metro Parks system was originally established in 1945, and today is made up of 16 parks with more than 175 miles of trails, 26,000 acres of land and water in 7 central Ohio counties.  Each year more than 6 million people visit the parks to escape the hustle and bustle of their everyday lives to discover and experience nature.  For nature photographers, it’s wonderful to have all these parks with almost unlimited photographic opportunities available without having to travel very far!  In today’s post I feature images from Slate Run Metro Park and Inniswood Metro Gardens.

Restored 1800’s era covered bridge – Click image to enlarge

The image above is of a restored 1800’s era covered bridge in Slate Run Metro Park taken in the fall.  With the name “Slate Run” you’d think that the land beneath the park was slate rock, but the early settlers mistook the dark soil for slate.  It’s actually shale, a softer rock made from clay deposited millions of years ago.  The park covers 1,705 acres and has about 12 miles of trails that take you through open fields, forests, ravines and grasslands.  The park also features the Slate Run Living Historical Farm where visitors can learn about and help with chores on a working 1880’s farm.  To find out more about Slate Run Metro Park, visit their website here.

Below is an image from Inniswood Metro Gardens and is taken from inside the Herb Hut looking out into the surrounding herb garden.  I like the picture within a picture effect of this composition as you look through the circular window covered with vines out into the surrounding garden.  It reminds me of the round doors and windows of the Shire in J.R.R. Tolkien’s fictional Middle-earth described in his “Lord of the Rings” novels.

Inside the Herb Hut look out – Click image to enlarge

Inniswood Metro Gardens is set within a scenic nature preserve and features many special gardens filled with beautifully landscaped flowerbeds, rock gardens and lawns.  The park boasts more than 2,000 species of plants, specialty collections of hostas, daffodils, daylilies, and several theme gardens including the rose, herb, and woodland rock garden.  To find out more about Inniswood Metro Gardens, visit their website here.

If you have any questions about this website or my photography, I’d love to hear from you.  Please click here to email me.

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